Awareness, Safety, STIs

Birth Control

preconception: health topics, wadena county family planningHormonal Birth Control Methods

Birth Control with Estrogen and Progestin: The Pill, Patch and Ring

Advantages include:

  • Lighter periods and less menstrual cramps
  • Reduced risk of ovarian and endometrial cancer
  • May reduce acne
  • Fertility will return as soon as you stop using Pill, Patch or Ring

Disadvantages include:

  • Increased risk of rare but serious problems including blood clots
  • Because of these risks, some women should not use birth control with estrogen, including women over 35 who smoke and women with certain medical conditions
  • Does not protect against STls/HIV

faviconThe Pill (Oral Contraceptives)

  • Effectiveness: 99% perfect use; 92% typical use
  • Take 1 pill each day

faviconThe Patch

  • Effectiveness: 99% effective; 92% typical use
  • Wear patch for 7 days, then change patches
  • After wearing patches for 3 weeks, take one week off (this is when you will have a period)
  • Not as effective for women who weigh more than 198 lbs

faviconThe Ring (NuvaRing®)

  • Effectiveness: 99% perfect use; 92% typical use
  • The ring stays in your vagina for 21 days (3 weeks). Take the ring out for 7 days (this is when you will have a period). Put in a new ring for the next month.

Birth Control with Progestin only: The Shot and Progestin-only Pill

Advantages include:

  • Can be used by women who cannot take estrogen
  • Lighter periods and less menstrual cramps
  • Reduced risk of ovarian and endometrial cancers

Disadvantages include:

  • Does not protect against STls/HIV
  • Occasional irregular bleeding or spotting, which often goes away the longer you use the method

faviconThe Shot (DMPA, “Depo”)

  • Effectiveness: 99% perfect use; 93% typical use
  • Get 1 shot every 3 months
  • May cause spotting at first; many women stop having a period at all
  • Disadvantages to the Shot:
    • Decreases bone density and may increase your risk of osteoporosis
    • May cause some weight gain
    • May take up to 18 months for fertility to return after stopping the Shot

faviconThe Progestin-only Pill (Mini Pill)

  • Effectiveness: 99% perfect use; 92% typical use
  • Take 1 pill every day: You must take pill at the same time every day

faviconThe Mirena IUD is also progestin-only. See below for information on IUD’s.

faviconImplanon (a single rod implant inserted in the upper inner arm)

  • Effectiveness: 99% perfect and typical use
  • Lasts 3 years
  • Most common side effect is irregular bleeding

Barrier Birth Control Methods

faviconThe Condom

  • Effectiveness: 98% perfect use; 85% typical use
  • The condom fits onto a man’s penis
  • Use a new condom every time you have sex
  • Made of latex or non-latex (polyurethane)
  • Some condoms are lubricated or scented
  • Does not need a prescription
  • Helps protect against STls/HIV

faviconThe Female Condom

  • Effectiveness: 95% perfect use; 79% typical use
  • The female condom fits inside a woman’s vagina
  • Use a new female condom every time you have sex
  • Made of polyurethane (plastic) and lubricant
  • Does not need a prescription
  • Helps protect against STls/HIV

faviconThe Diaphragm

  • Effectiveness: 94% perfect use; 84% typical use
  • Put the diaphragm and spermicide in your vagina every time you have sex
  • One diaphragm usually lasts 2 years
  • Does not protect against STls/HIV
  • Should not be used by women allergic to spermicide

faviconSpermicides (Foam, Film, Jelly)

  • Effectiveness when used alone: 82% perfect use; 71 % typical use
  • Meant to be used with other methods: condoms, female condoms, diaphragms, the Pill, etc.
  • Should not be used by people who are allergic to spermicide or at risk for HIV

Other Birth Control Methods

faviconAbstinence (Choosing to Not Have Sex)

  • Effectiveness: 100% if you never have a man’s semen (cum) near the woman’s vagina (no vaginal sex, anal sex, or semen on/near the vagina)
  • You can always choose to not have sex
  • Free and does not need a prescription
  • Protects against STls/HIV if you do not have body-to-body contact or contact with body fluids

faviconThe IUD

  • Effectiveness: 99% perfect and typical use
  • An IUD is put into your uterus by a clinician
  • The ParaGard IUD is made of plastic and copper
    • Can be used for 12 years
    • ParaGard may make periods heavier
  • The Mirena IUD is made of plastic and 1 hormone (progestin)
    • Can be used for 5 years
    • Mirena will make periods lighter with less cramps
  • Does not protect against STls/HIV

faviconNatural Family Planning (Periodic Abstinence)

  • Effectiveness: 98% perfect use; 75% typical use
  • Uses a combination of 3 methods to estimate when you are more likely to get pregnant:
    • Keep a calendar
    • Take your basal temperature every day
    • Check the mucus from your cervix every day
  • Do not have sex on the days you are more likely to get pregnant (usually 10 to 14 days per month)
  • Not effective for women who do not have regular periods
  • Does not protect against STls/HIV
  • Classes to learn these methods are highly recommended

faviconSterilization (Tubal Sterilization, Vasectomy)

  • Effectiveness: 99% perfect and typical use
  • For women or men who do not ever want to have more children
  • Permanent birth control – usually can’t be undone
  • Tubal Sterilization is a procedure intended to permanently block a woman’s fallopian tubes to prevent sperm from reaching her eggs
  • Vasectomy is a procedure intended to permanently block a man’s vas deferens to prevent his sperm from getting into his ejaculate (cum)

More Birth Control information:

faviconMayo Clinic Birth Control Guide

faviconPlanned Parenthood

faviconPublic Health Seattle and King County, Washington

Information on choosing birth control and methods available, current and nicely done, resources not Minnesota

faviconWomen’s Health.gov

Frequently asked questions on birth control methods

Birth Control – Emergency Contraception:

faviconThe Emergency Contraception Website

Get emergency contraception, questions and answers

faviconWomen’s Health.gov

Frequently asked questions on emergency contraception.

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